Monday, February 26, 2007

Thinking About Our Final Performance

A guy came up to me last night at the Oscar party we attended and said, "So, I hear your last performance is on March 11th. We're going to come one more time before then, but then we HAVE to be there for your last show. It's really going to be emotional, isn't it?"

(Jim and I are leaving the show March 11th, if you haven't been keeping up, as we're recasting the show this week with two new actors to be announced next week.)

I looked at him and said, "I really hadn't thought about it, but yeah, I guess it will be an emotional evening."

I've been working so hard on updating the score and scheduling as many rehearsals with Devin Richards, Rhe De Ville, Stephen Wilde and as many other singers as I can, that I haven't really thought about it very much. I'm so excited to see the show in new hands -- to finally see it as we dreamed it: An authentic musical being done by New York actors -- that it just didn't occur to me to think about March 11th as a "last" day. The show will go on. And, who knows, we might even come back and do it again here if it continues to grow.

The funny thing about a show is that when it's running, you think it's going to run forever. I can't even IMAGINE The Big Voice not running. I feel like we OWN the Actors' Temple. It feels so permanent. I do want it to run forever!

The Equity open casting call is this next Friday. Who knows who will walk in the door? All I know is I'm very excited to see the show from the audience for the very first time. It was thrilling to see The Last Session that way. I know The Big Voice is going to be just as powerful.

Also, for smaller theaters who would like to license The Big Voice. Have good news. Samuel French has licensed the show for stock and amateur rights. It will be available soon. When I get a more specific release date, I'll post it here and on the The Big Voice site. How exciting! I just know that there are two mature men in just about every city in the country would love to play the romantic leads for a change. (And it's funny to think that they'll be portraying Jim and myself. What started out as a one night concert has turned into this off-Broadway, critically acclaimed hit musical. Funny how that works. You do your work and the next thing you know, you're on 47th Street being portrayed by another actor.)

Life is funny.
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