Tuesday, March 18, 2008

Obama's Remarkable Speech On Race In America.

Rarely in my lifetime have I ever heard a speech which contains so many complicated hard truths about race in America. This is the conversation this country has been needing to have and Barack Obama nailed it with inclusivity and compassion.

6 comments:

Amy Lynn said...

Like I said before, we are big Obama fans. :) Beautiful. and Brave.

Gabi Clayton said...

Yes Steve I completely agree with you and with Amy.

I've posted about it a bit on my blog as well.

Anonymous said...

It's a great speech, but I'm not completely comfortable with this.

If a white minister used similarly angry and stereotype-filled rhetoric about black people, would we be satisfied with the same sort of comments made by Obama regarding Jeremiah Wright?

Would we accept that it is perfecttly fine for the candidate to continue supporting that minister's church, even if he said he did not condone those specific remarks?

-Michael

SteveSchalchlin said...

Michael, I think that's a fair question to ask. The issue of race in this country is complicated.

Jackie said...

I posted a bit about it too. Race is indeed a complicated American burden that's been swept under the rug way too long. We need to talk.

Some of the finest people I know are from Trinity Church. I've heard dozens of Rev, Wright's sermons and I never heard anything racist, quite the contrary. I've seen him get very emotional and blatantly honest, but never hateful. So the snippets shown on TV surprised me too. If Obama loses, he loses, but it would be a shame if it was because of Wright.

^..^ Figaro & Jett ^..^ said...

This is certainly a hot issue. I'm actually glad it came up and I don't disagree with what Obama has said. Or with what Rev. Wright has said, for that matter. But it does raise additional significant questions that warrant discussion. It's about far more than race. We do have some serious problems in this country and I'm anxious for a new president who can start us in a healthier direction, whether it's Clinton or Obama.
-Michael

Cold Comfort (at Mae Mae)